Artefino | [Lopez Link] ArteFino captures the Filipino’s heritage journey
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[Lopez Link] ArteFino captures the Filipino’s heritage journey

[Lopez Link] ArteFino captures the Filipino’s heritage journey

By HR Council


ArteFino, Manila’s premier craft fair returns to Rockwell, at its new venue, the Fifth at Rockwell, Power Plant Mall. It opens its doors on August 29 to September 1 for four days.

On its third year, “Pamana” (or heritage) is the pervasive theme for ArteFino. The organizers and the purveyors collectively acknowledge the importance of heritage. The heritage journey is captured by the total experience with an ongoing focus on global quality, encouraging social entrepreneurship and showcasing artisanal art.

The fair comes together through the efforts of its founders. Maritess Pineda, Mita Rufino, Cedie Lopez Vargas, Susie Quiros and Mel Francisco are staunch art and culture advocates. The five women, viewed by many as thought leaders, are passionate about creating a venue for likeminded individuals to pursue the best of the Filipino. ArteFino is their brainchild.

The fair is moving beyond a curated lifestyle. Over the last few years, ArteFino has forged strong partnerships with its community and patrons toward evolving the notion of conscious consumerism—taking into consideration environmental impact, heritage processes in creating the product, and overall awareness of the community it supports.

The close to 130 participating brands have evangelized a new awareness to each item made available at the fair.

The HeArteFino Development Program embodies the values of the organization. The program has the primary intention of growing the community. The ongoing goal is to bring local artisans closer to a sustainable livelihood by elevating their living traditions to adapt to modern times. Through its developmental programs, it gives out a variety of aid to the community, the artistentrepreneur, or both.

The “Pamana” movement is highlighted in the choice of vendors. Workmanship in embroidery, weaving, carving and bespoke jewelry is now overrun by machines—losing the heritage that once was the hallmark of bespoke.

The evolving buyer will help the organizers advocate for functionality and modernity in these traditions, making them part of daily living. Furthermore, the team is preparing its social responsibility efforts to ensure that traditions throughout the country continue, and are adequately supported through awareness and funding.

Adornata

Adornata

The annual fair also provides a venue for new entrepreneurs with Finds by ArteFino. This year, De La Salle College of St. Benilde’s industrial design students are joining the fair.

The fair returns to Rockwell yet again and considers the community their home. Rockwell has also evolved as a stalwart of Filipino ingenuity and entrepreneurship, capturing Filipino elements in its developments.

Like Rockwell, ArteFino promises to capture the vibrancy of the Filipino artisan. Stories unfold as vendors experiment and develop product for a collection that complements the changing Filipino lifestyle.

Mich Dulce

Mich Dulce

Great Women

GREAT Women

MARSSE Tropical Timbre Platations

MARSSE

C&C

C&C

Lara

Lara

Island Girl

Island Girl

Herman & Co

Herman & Co.

Casa San Pablo Clay Storytellers

Casa San Pablo Clay Storytellers


Read the original article here.

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